Right Now in Savor

Ranch, America's favorite salad dressing, originated on an actual dude ranch. Guest Ben Bowlin joins Anney and Lauren to wrangle the cool American history of ranch as a condiment and flavor -- plus the science behind why it's often served with hot wings.

Profiles in Deliciousness: Isabella Beeton

Isabella Beeton wrote the book on how to run a Victorian kitchen – "Mrs. Beeton's Book of Household Management" – and her brand survives today. But Beeton wasn't a stodgy matron. We explore the fashionable, savvy woman behind this seminal cookbook.

Cocktail Hour: The Mimosa

The combination of orange juice and sparkling wine is an American brunch classic, but its arrival on the scene is pretty recent. Anney and Lauren dive into the history of the mimosa -- and the economics of the bottomless mimosa brunch.

Nutritional Yeast: Rising to the Occasion

Nutritional yeast is a recent-ish edible innovation that provides a vegan source of protein and cheesy/savory flavors, but it's far from the first yeast humans have consumed. Anney and Lauren delve into the weird history and science of nutritional yeast.

Savor on Ice!

Frozen water not only chills our tea and cocktails -- for centuries, it was one of the only ways to keep fresh food from spoiling. Anney and Lauren dig into the sometimes rocky history and extremely cool science of ice.

The Concentrated Orange Episode

Sweet oranges have been prized for their bright, fragrant skin and juice for at least 4,000 years, but our modern concepts of them are mostly due to marketing campaigns. Anney and Lauren get juiced up about the history and culture of oranges.

Dishing On Tetrazzini

Tetrazzini is a dish with as many possible ingredients as it has possible origin stories. Anney and Lauren swing into the tetrazzini-verse to explore this comforting, all-American casserole.

The Neat Scotch Episode

This liquor originated in Scotland as the 'water of life', but scotch-style whisk(e)ys are now made the world over. Anney and Lauren dip into the history and science behind scotch, with help from local Atlanta distillers American Spirit Works.

We Like You A Latke

Latkes are the crispy potato pancakes associated with Hanukkah celebrations -- but they weren't always made of potato. Anney and Lauren get to the root of latke history (and the science behind making them the tastiest).

Bonus: A Whole Milk Science Episode

There are many different types of milk on the market -- even considering dairy alone, a lot of technologies go into processing more stable, reliable products. In this sponsored bonus episode, Anney and Lauren dive into the history and science behind milk.

To Brie, Or Not To Brie

That is the question: Whether 'tis nobler in the caves to age to the firmness and funk of outrageous Roquefort, or to take weeks to form a rind of yeast poops, and, post-ripening, eat them. (Sorry I borked the meter. We’re talking about brie, y’all. /LV)

Wasabi: Not Horsin' Around

This spicy-hot Japanese plant is known as a condiment for sushi around the world, but most humans have never had the real thing. Anney and Lauren dig into the history and science of wasabi -- both the original and imitations.

Scratchin' Our Noggins About Eggnog

How did this drinkable (and usually alcoholic) custard become a winter holiday standard? Anney and Lauren dip into the history of eggnog -- plus the science of how raw eggs and dairy can be not just safe to drink, but safe to keep for months.

Big Gum Questions

While it's not strictly a food, humans have been chewing gum-type stuff for 9,000 years. Anney and Lauren blow up the history, science, and sticky menace of chewing gum.

The Doorstopping Story of Fruitcake

This oft-mocked holiday dessert wasn't always so maligned. Anney and Lauren explore the well-preserved history and rich science behind fruitcakes. (And plum puddings, a little bit.)

Yes Pecan

This nut is a Southern U.S. staple — and has been since way before such a thing existed. Anney and Lauren break open the history and culture behind pecans.

Food Fairy Tales: The Almond Tree

Because fairy tales so often feature food (er, and cannibalism), we’re offering up a dramatic reading of the Grimms' 'The Almond Tree', along with commentary and special guests Stuff They Don’t Want You To Know, Julie Douglas, and Alexander Williams.

The Over-Stuffed Thanksgiving Episode

This one's got all the fixings: the competing histories of the 'first' Thanksgiving, how one 19th-century woman dictated the main traditions, how subcultures are making Thanksgiving their own, why some protest the holiday, and Anney’s many mishaps.

Bonus Interview: Changing How We Farm

Our tastes and considerations as eaters are changing, and small farms have to stay ahead of those curves to ensure success. We talk with fourth-generation farmer Jamie Ager about how being sustainable, humane, and open can actually be a boon to business.

Hail Seitan

This vegetarian protein is made from wheat (and it's pronounced say-TAHN, but we couldn't resist the joke). Anney and Lauren dig into the debated history and gooey, chewy science of seitan.