Right Now in Savor

This spicy-hot Japanese plant is known as a condiment for sushi around the world, but most humans have never had the real thing. Anney and Lauren dig into the history and science of wasabi -- both the original and imitations.

Scratchin' Our Noggins About Eggnog

How did this drinkable (and usually alcoholic) custard become a winter holiday standard? Anney and Lauren dip into the history of eggnog -- plus the science of how raw eggs and dairy can be not just safe to drink, but safe to keep for months.

Big Gum Questions

While it's not strictly a food, humans have been chewing gum-type stuff for 9,000 years. Anney and Lauren blow up the history, science, and sticky menace of chewing gum.

The Doorstopping Story of Fruitcake

This oft-mocked holiday dessert wasn't always so maligned. Anney and Lauren explore the well-preserved history and rich science behind fruitcakes. (And plum puddings, a little bit.)

Yes Pecan

This nut is a Southern U.S. staple — and has been since way before such a thing existed. Anney and Lauren break open the history and culture behind pecans.

Food Fairy Tales: The Almond Tree

Because fairy tales so often feature food (er, and cannibalism), we’re offering up a dramatic reading of the Grimms' 'The Almond Tree', along with commentary and special guests Stuff They Don’t Want You To Know, Julie Douglas, and Alexander Williams.

The Over-Stuffed Thanksgiving Episode

This one's got all the fixings: the competing histories of the 'first' Thanksgiving, how one 19th-century woman dictated the main traditions, how subcultures are making Thanksgiving their own, why some protest the holiday, and Anney’s many mishaps.

Bonus Interview: Changing How We Farm

Our tastes and considerations as eaters are changing, and small farms have to stay ahead of those curves to ensure success. We talk with fourth-generation farmer Jamie Ager about how being sustainable, humane, and open can actually be a boon to business.

Hail Seitan

This vegetarian protein is made from wheat (and it's pronounced say-TAHN, but we couldn't resist the joke). Anney and Lauren dig into the debated history and gooey, chewy science of seitan.

My Island for Some Nutmeg

Spices like nutmeg drove European exploration and globalization -- and meant genocide for the native producers. We explore this history (and the psychedelic science) of nutmeg.

Consider the Red Lobster

The Red Lobster restaurant chain made seafood accessibly aspirational to inland, middle class Americans. Anney and Lauren dive into the stories behind its successes and scandals -- and those cheddar biscuits. 

Farewell, Asheville

As we finish out our miniseries on Asheville, NC, we wanted to share a few more stories about the flavor of the city -- and what challenges it faces in the future. 

Bonus Interview: French Broad Chocolates

Chocolate's main ingredients, cacao & sugar, have a long history as crops that can be harmful to their farmers and environments. So what does it take to make chocolate responsibly? We talk with Asheville chocolate makers about their journey to bean-to-bar.

The Scorn of Candy Corn

Candy corn is the second most popular Halloween candy in the U.S. -- and probably the most divisive. Anney and Lauren dig into the history of how candy corn rose to fame (or infamy), plus explore the science of how it's made.

An Amaro Never Reveals Its Secrets

Amari, bitter liquors long loved in Europe, are catching on and even being made here in the States. Anney & Lauren delve into the weird history of amaro with help from an Asheville producer – and present the ghost story that inspired their name.

Bonus Episode: Street Food Moves Us

Chef Meherwan Irani brought Indian street food to the mountains of Appalachia and the heart of the South. In this interview, we talk with him about how these foods remix and resonate through the cultures they touch, and how food has shaped humanity.

Mayonnaise and Mayo-Nays

Mayonnaise may be the spread that binds sandwiches together, but it seriously divides opinion: Which brand is best? Does it deserve to be there at all? Anney & Lauren get into the thick of the history and science behind mayo.

The Health of the Food Industry

Food unites humanity, but the food industry can be a divisive place to work. We look at Asheville as a microcosm of the issues plaguing U.S. food and restaurant workers -- and of how we can come together to help solve those issues.

Bonus Episode: Taking Cues from a Pitmaster

Chef Elliott Moss brought whole-hog, wood-coal, Eastern Carolina barbecue to Asheville. In this interview, we cover the comfort of ‘cue (and other classic Carolina dishes), his inspirations, and how a BBQ restaurant wound up being his artistic outlet.

Mind Your Own Biscuits

Southern biscuits are the fluffy, flaky stuff of dreams, but they're a fairly new invention. Anney and Lauren explore how these biscuits came to be, how to make them at home, and why ‘biscuit’ in British English is a different baked good entirely.