Podcasts

To Brie, Or Not To Brie

That is the question: Whether 'tis nobler in the caves to age to the firmness and funk of outrageous Roquefort, or to take weeks to form a rind of yeast poops, and, post-ripening, eat them. (Sorry I borked the meter. We’re talking about brie, y’all. /LV)

Wasabi: Not Horsin' Around

This spicy-hot Japanese plant is known as a condiment for sushi around the world, but most humans have never had the real thing. Anney and Lauren dig into the history and science of wasabi -- both the original and imitations.

Scratchin' Our Noggins About Eggnog

How did this drinkable (and usually alcoholic) custard become a winter holiday standard? Anney and Lauren dip into the history of eggnog -- plus the science of how raw eggs and dairy can be not just safe to drink, but safe to keep for months.

Big Gum Questions

While it's not strictly a food, humans have been chewing gum-type stuff for 9,000 years. Anney and Lauren blow up the history, science, and sticky menace of chewing gum.

The Doorstopping Story of Fruitcake

This oft-mocked holiday dessert wasn't always so maligned. Anney and Lauren explore the well-preserved history and rich science behind fruitcakes. (And plum puddings, a little bit.)

Yes Pecan

This nut is a Southern U.S. staple — and has been since way before such a thing existed. Anney and Lauren break open the history and culture behind pecans.

Food Fairy Tales: The Almond Tree

Because fairy tales so often feature food (er, and cannibalism), we’re offering up a dramatic reading of the Grimms' 'The Almond Tree', along with commentary and special guests Stuff They Don’t Want You To Know, Julie Douglas, and Alexander Williams.

The Over-Stuffed Thanksgiving Episode

This one's got all the fixings: the competing histories of the 'first' Thanksgiving, how one 19th-century woman dictated the main traditions, how subcultures are making Thanksgiving their own, why some protest the holiday, and Anney’s many mishaps.

Bonus Interview: Changing How We Farm

Our tastes and considerations as eaters are changing, and small farms have to stay ahead of those curves to ensure success. We talk with fourth-generation farmer Jamie Ager about how being sustainable, humane, and open can actually be a boon to business.

Hail Seitan

This vegetarian protein is made from wheat (and it's pronounced say-TAHN, but we couldn't resist the joke). Anney and Lauren dig into the debated history and gooey, chewy science of seitan.